Actos Lowers Risk of Developing Diabetes in Those with Prediabetes

April 5th, 2011

prescription actosA commonly prescribed diabetes medication dramatically lowered the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in a recent study of over 600 people with prediabetes, or high blood sugar. Study participants taking the oral diabetes medication Actos experienced a 72 percent reduction in diabetes risk.

Actos, or generic pioglitazone, helps control blood sugar by decreasing insulin resistance. Increasing insulin sensitivity can have a dramatic impact on diabetes risk, according to the researchers.

To read the entire story online on WebMD, click >HERE<.

Scientists Discover Why Oral Diabetes Medication Causes Weight Gain

May 3rd, 2011

Thiazolidinediones, also known as glitazones, are a widely prescribed class of oral diabetes medications. The most commonly used thiazolidinedione is prescription Actos, also known as generic pioglitazone. Thiazolidinediones act by binding to a group of receptor molecules called PPAR-y which regulate the production of fat cells, improving their receptivity to insulin and therefore reducing insulin resistance.

Although effective, pioglitazone has a down side - one of Actos side effects is considerable weight gain. This is of particular concern to diabetics, many of whom have been instructed to lose weight to help control their condition.

Before this study, it was believed that weight gain in patients taking oral diabetes medication was due to PPAR-y's effect on fat cells. Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) have now discovered that the diabetes medication delivers a double-whammy. It not only stimulates the production of fat cells, it also causes changes in the part of the brain which effects appetite, increasing hunger.

The researchers also conducted experiments to see if the PPAR-y molecular system is activated by a high fat diet. Experiments with animals showed that to be the case. This suggests that Americans' fondness for high-fat foods that activate PPAR-y might be contributing to our rising rates of obesity, and the associated increase in diabetes.

According to lead researcher Randy Seeley, PhD, PPAR-y is a system designed to promote eating more and gaining weight. "It tells your brain to eat more, and it tells your fat tissue to add new fat cells to serve as repositories to store those extra calories," explains Seeley, a UC professor.

It's hoped that these discoveries may lead to modified diabetes medications that still lower blood sugar, but without impacting the part of the brain effecting appetite. "If you artificially turn on PPAR-y, you can increase food intake in rats," explained Seeley, "[But] if you block these receptors in animals on high fat diets that make animals obese, they gain less weight."

Seeley stresses the importance of understanding how what we eat affects our bodies. "We know that one way to activate PPAR-y is by exposing cells to fatty acids," he points out, "If we know which ones activate PPAR-y, we could find ways to alter diets so as to limit their ability to turn on this system that drives increased food intake, making it easier for people to avoid weight gain."

FDA Approves New Type 2 Diabetes Medication

May 4th, 2011

diabetes medicationThe FDA has approved a new oral diabetes medication, Tradjenta (linagliptin) to help control blood glucose in type 2 diabetics. Tradjenta works by blocking the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), resulting in increased levels of hormones which stimulate the release of insulin after eating.

Tradjenta was tested in almost 4000 diabetics in eight separate double-blind clinical studies. It was studied both by as a stand-alone therapy, and in combination with other current diabetes medications such as glimepiride, pioglitazone, and metformin. It has not been tested along with insulin injections, and is not recommended for use by insulin dependent type 1 diabetics.

Tradjenta is meant to be used along with diet and exercise. People with diabetic ketoacidosis (high levels of ketones in the blood or urine) are cautioned not to use linagliptin. People taking the antibiotic rifampin, used to treat tuberculosis, should also avoid Tradjenta. The most common side effects of linagliptin were nasal congestion or a runny nose, sore throat, upper respiratory infection headache, and muscle pain.

An estimated 24 million Americans have diabetes, and up to 95 percent of them have the most common form, type 2. People with Type 2 diabetes either can't produce or are resistant to the effects of insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas which regulates blood sugar. A lack of insulin or insulin resistance lead to high blood sugar levels, which can cause serious, and even life threatening, complications.

Some type 2 diabetics can control their blood sugar with diet and exercise, but many require oral diabetes medication or even insulin injections. The existing diabetes medications Januvia and Onglyza are also DPP-4 inhibitors. While all in the same class, the three diabetes drugs appear to have significant differences in effect, making it important that non insulin dependent diabetics have yet another option to successfully control their blood sugar.

The new diabetes medication is the first of its class to be approved at one dosage strength (5 mg) for all patients, including those with kidney or liver impairment. In another first, the diabetes drug is marketed by an alliance of Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc in Connecticut, and Eli Lilly in Indianapolis.

Enzyme Discovery May Lead to New Diabetes Medication

May 13th, 2011

Researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have discovered a mechanism that stimulates glucose production in the liver in response to a drop in blood sugar. Histone deacetylasses (HDACs) are a group of enzymes that respond to what researchers call "fasting signals".

Fasting signals kick in after long periods without food, such as overnight. HDACs are situated in liver cells, usually outside of the nucleus. The Salk researchers discovered that they move rapidly into the cell in response to fasting signals, and turn on the genes that produce glucose.

After a meal, the hormone insulin normally prompts cells to store glucose for future fuel, and turns off the liver's sugar production to avoid blood glucose from getting too high. Many people with type 2 diabetes have insulin resistance, a condition in which the body no longer responds properly to insulin, allowing the liver to continue manufacturing glucose, resulting in high blood sugar.

Currently, most type 2 diabetics are prescribed an oral diabetes medication called metformin (marketed as Glucophage XR) to help control their blood sugar levels. "Metformin is originally derived from a plant found in Western Europe called 'French lilac' or 'Goat's Rue because goats don't like to eat it, explains scientist Reuben Shaw, Ph.D., "They steered clear of the plant because it contains a compound that acts naturally to lower blood glucose in animals that eat it to prevent them from eating it again."

Shaw researched metformin to find out how it helped insulin to control blood sugar. He discovered it binds to AMPK, a metabolic regulating enzyme which blocks glucose production in the liver. A graduate student in his laboratory, Maria Mihhaylova, then delved into targets of AMPKs relevant to diabetes, eventually focusing on a family of HDACs called class II HDACs.

In collaboration with two other labs, Mihhaylova discovered that HDACs only controlled glucose synthesizing enzymes in response to the fasting hormone glucagon. "In response to the glucagon, chemical modifications on class II HDACs are removed, and they can translocate into the [liver cell] nucleus", she explains.

The team went on to perform tests on mice with dramatic results - suppression of HDACs restored blood glucose levels to near normal in four different models of type 2 diabetes. "These exciting results show that drugs that inhibit the activity of class II HDACs may be worthwhile to be pursued as potential diabetes drugs," says Shaw.

The search for a new and improved diabetes medication may get a boost from current cancer research - prescription drug companies have been developing HDAC inhibitors as anti-cancer drugs. Shaw hopes that some of the compounds they have developed could have therapeutic potential for the treatment of insulin resistance and diabetes, whether or not they are effective against cancer.

To view Shaw's explanation of his team's discovery on YouTube, >CLICK HERE<.

Diabetics May Have Super-Sticky Cholesterol

May 30th, 2011

As if having diabetes isn't troubling enough, the British Heart Foundation is now warning that type 2 diabetics are more likely to have a newly discovered super-sticky "ultra bad" form of cholesterol. This extra sticky cholesterol is more likely to adhere to and build up in the arteries, forming dangerous artery-narrowing plaque. These narrowed or blocked arteries are the cause of coronary heart disease and resulting heart attacks and strokes.

The super-sticky cholesterol, called MGmin-LDL, is formed by the bonding of a sugar molecule (such as glucose or fructose) to a lipid molecule (such as low density lipoprotein) in a process called glycation. Glycation changes the shape of LDL molecules, making them smaller and denser and creating more exposed areas that are likely to stick to artery walls.

Low density lipoprotein, or LDL, enables the transfer of lipids (fatty substances) like cholesterol and triglycerides in the bloodstream. High levels of LDL cholesterol are a major risk factor for heart disease, as is diabetes. Narrowed arteries not only reduce blood flow, they can rupture, releasing a blood clot. If the clot causes a blockage in the heart, it can cause a heart attack, and if it lands in the brain, it can cause a stroke.

In fact, America's over 25 million diabetics are twice as likely to develop heart or vascular disease as the general population, and at least sixty percent of diabetics die from a cardiovascular event such as a heart attack or stroke. There is a direct correlation between the amount of plaque in their arteries and the risk of early death for diabetics.

These new findings may help explain the increased risk of coronary heart disease in diabetics. The discovery of the relationship between blood glucose and the formation of "ultra bad" cholesterol also explains why use of the widely prescribed oral diabetes medication Glucophage (generic metformin) has been linked to a reduced risk of heart attack. The diabetes medicine is believed to block the transformation of LDL to the stickier MGmin-LDL.

It's hoped that the discovery of this new type of more harmful cholesterol will lead to advancements in the prevention and treatment of heart disease in both diabetics and the elderly, who are also more likely to develop MGmin-LDL.

"Understanding exactly how 'ultra-bad' LDL damages arteries is crucial," stresses British Heart Foundation Research Advisor Dr. Shannon Amoils, "As this knowledge could help develop new anti-cholesterol treatments for patients."

"We've known for a long time that people with diabetes are at greater risk of heart attack and stroke," says Amoils, "There is still more work to be done to untangle why this is the case, but this study is an important step in the right direction." The next step for the British researchers is to develop treatments to target this more dangerous type of cholesterol, and to help neutralize its harmful effects on diabetics' arteries.

FDA: Long-Term Use of Actos May Be Associated With Bladder Cancer

June 17th, 2011

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is informing the public that use of the diabetes medication Actos (pioglitazone) for more than one year may be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. Information about this risk will be added to the Warnings and Precautions section of the label for pioglitazone-containing medicines. The patient Medication Guide for these medicines will also be revised to include information on the risk of bladder cancer.

This safety information is based on FDA's review of data from a planned five-year interim analysis of an ongoing, ten-year epidemiological study1, described in FDA's September 2010 ongoing safety review and in the Data Summary. The five-year results showed that although there was no overall increased risk of bladder cancer with pioglitazone use, an increased risk of bladder cancer was noted among patients with the longest exposure to pioglitazone, and in those exposed to the highest cumulative dose of pioglitazone.

To read the Safety Announcement on the FDA website, >CLICK HERE.<

Weird Warning for Diabetics With Pets

June 24th, 2011

Jack Russell terrier

The Director of the Amputation Prevention Center at the Valley Presbyterian Hospital in Van Nuys, Dr. Lee C. Rogers, has a warning for diabetic pet owners who have suffered a loss of feeling due to nerve damage.

The warning stems from an incident in which a two-year-old Jack Russell terrier chewed off the infected big toe of its owner while she slept. The 48-year-old Des Moines woman woke in the morning to find part of her toe missing, and blood on her bed and her pet's face.

"She didn't feel it at all," said Rogers, a podiatrist who treated the woman, "When she woke up, there was blood all over the place." Rogers eventually had to amputate the woman's leg after she developed an infection - leaving her a double amputee.

Rogers is now cautioning diabetics who have lost feeling in their limbs to cover their feet and any wounds while sleeping. "Pets have a tendency to lick wounds, and that simple lick can turn into a bite if there is no response from its owner," warns Rogers, adding that there has also been cases of dog's saliva infecting their owners with dangerous bacteria.

About 60 to 70 percent of diabetics have some sort of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to poor diabetes control. Diabetic neuropathy results from years of high blood glucose levels, and often begins with a loss of sensation in the feet.

Diabetic neuropathy is a leading cause of amputation, although staff at the Amputation Prevention Center have achieved a limb salvage rate of 96 percent since opening its doors in January of 2010. The Center uses cutting-edge technology and a unique team approach. It recorded an average healing rate of 52 days in its 350 patients the first year, less than half the national average of 120 days.

Oddly, this is not the first known incident of this type. Last year a Michigan man with type 2 diabetes lost part of his big toe when his Jack Russell bit it off after the man passed out from a night of drinking. Doctors who treated him after the incident said they would have had to amputate the toe anyway.

Diabetic neuropathy is not an inevitable part of having diabetes. It can be avoided, or at the very least, minimized with proper diabetes control. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetics can control their condition with lifestyle changes like diet and exercise, careful blood glucose monitoring, and oral diabetes medication insulin injections if needed.

Consider an Online Canadian Pharmacy When You Buy Lantus

June 30th, 2011

Lantus is a popular basal, or long acting, insulin used in the treatment of both type 1 and type 1 diabetes mellitus. The diabetes medication is suitable for both adult and pediatric patients with Type 1 diabetes, and for adults with Type 2 diabetes who require long-acting insulin injections to control hyperglycemia.

Lantus long acting insulin has some key benefits: it is used only once daily, it has no pronounced peak; it lowers basal glucose levels for a full 24 hours; and it can be used with oral diabetes medications and/or short-acting insulin for better diabetes control. One of the biggest advantages of Lantus is that, due to its lack of peak, it decreases the risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia.

Lantus (insulin glargine), marketed by Sanofi-Aventis, currently leads the long acting insulin market, generating sales of almost $4 billion a year globally. Lantus is available in both conventional vials and the discreet and convenient pre-filled Lantus SoloSTAR insulin pen.

Many diabetics help manage the cost of daily insulin injections by buying their diabetes medication from a Canadian online pharmacy. The Canadian government regulates prescription drug prices, and does not allow pharmaceutical companies to engage in expensive direct to consumer marketing, helping to keep drug prices lower.

The Canadian government also allows drug companies to manufacturer cheaper (but chemically identical) generic versions of brand name drugs sooner than in the States. Canadian pharmacies are anticipating they will be able to provide their customers with affordable generic Lantus in the near future, so revisit longactinginsulin.com for updates.

It is not uncommon for a prescription purchased through a Canadian online pharmacy to be 50% cheaper than one purchased in the US, and not unheard of for it to be up to 90% cheaper. To buy Janumet online from a Canadian pharmacy, you must have a current valid prescription.

Be sure you are dealing with a reputable online Canada pharmacy by ensuring it does not offer drugs without a prescription, does not sell controlled substances such as narcotics, has clear contact information including a physical address, has a licensed pharmacist available to answer questions, and is accredited by the Canadian International Pharmacy Association.

Like all types of insulin, Lantus is only part of a complete program of diabetes treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, and regular blood sugar monitoring. Any decisions about your diabetes medication should be made together with your doctor or another health care professional.

Diabetes Drug Metformin Safer for the Heart

July 12th, 2011

The type 2 diabetes drug metformin is safer for the heart than other older diabetes medication, according to a two-year study. The findings are important because older patients with diabetes are at particular risk for cardiovascular disease, and because many of them are prescribed a class of diabetes medications called sulfonylureas that may raise this risk.

The controversial diabetes drug Avandia, which has been linked to heart problems, is a sulfonylureas diabetes drug. Sulfonylureas have also been linked to episodes of low blood sugar, and to weight gain.

Sulfonylureas drugs and metformin (also known by the brand name Glucophage) lower blood sugar in different ways. Metformin works by suppressing sugar production in the liver, while sulfonylureas work by increasing insulin production. To read more about the study findings on WebMD, >CLICK HERE.<

FDA Panel Recommends Against Approval of new Diabetes Medication

July 27th, 2011

diabetes medication

A panel of Food & Drug Administration advisors has voted 9 to 6 against the approval of the new oral diabetes drug, dapaglifozin. Dapaglifozin was developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb, and was to be marketed by AstraZeneca. The panel expressed concerns about both the medication's safety and its effectiveness, especially in the elderly.

Dapaglifozin proved as effective as current oral diabetes medications in otherwise healthy diabetics, but was not as effective in those with impaired kidney function. The panel was primarily concerned about a potential risk of breast and bladder cancers. In a two-year study, there were nine cases of bladder cancer and nine cases of breast cancer in the just under 5478 patients taking the new diabetes medication, compared to only one case of bladder cancer and one case of breast cancer in the 3156 patients in the control group.

There were also indications of possible kidney damage, and increased risks of genital and urinary tract infections. The panel also complained of insufficient data on which patient population the diabetes drug was best suited to, and on potential interactions with other medications.

Dapaglifozin belongs to a class of medications called SGLT2 inhibitors. SGLT2 inhibitors work by inhibiting the return of glucose filtered by the kidneys to the blood stream, redirecting it through the urinary tract to be excreted in the urine. It's believed the resulting high sugar levels in the urine is the cause of the increase in genital and urinary tract infections.

One advantage of SGLT2 inhibitors is that they work independently of insulin injections, allowing for more freedom in combining them with other diabetes medications. People taking dapaglifozin in clinical trials also lost an average of five pounds, and experienced a slight drop in blood pressure.

The panel recommendation will not only likely result in the FDA rejecting the diabetes medication, but it will also effect the approval of similar SGLT2 inhibitors being developed by a number of other major pharmaceutical companies, including Johnson & Johnson, GlaxoSmithKline, Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly.

The panel is calling for more clinical studies of the proposed diabetes drug. The FDA will make a final decision by the end of October, 2011, but given the panel's request for more trials, the approval of dapaglifozin is expected to be about two years away.

FDA Panel Recommends Against Approval of new Diabetes Medication

July 27th, 2011

diabetes medication

A panel of Food & Drug Administration advisors has voted 9 to 6 against the approval of the new oral diabetes drug, dapaglifozin. Dapaglifozin was developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb, and was to be marketed by AstraZeneca. The panel expressed concerns about both the medication's safety and its effectiveness, especially in the elderly.

Dapaglifozin proved as effective as current oral diabetes medications in otherwise healthy diabetics, but was not as effective in those with impaired kidney function. The panel was primarily concerned about a potential risk of breast and bladder cancers. In a two-year study, there were nine cases of bladder cancer and nine cases of breast cancer in the just under 5478 patients taking the new diabetes medication, compared to only one case of bladder cancer and one case of breast cancer in the 3156 patients in the control group.

There were also indications of possible kidney damage, and increased risks of genital and urinary tract infections. The panel also complained of insufficient data on which patient population the diabetes drug was best suited to, and on potential interactions with other medications.

Dapaglifozin belongs to a class of medications called SGLT2 inhibitors. SGLT2 inhibitors work by inhibiting the return of glucose filtered by the kidneys to the blood stream, redirecting it through the urinary tract to be excreted in the urine. It's believed the resulting high sugar levels in the urine is the cause of the increase in genital and urinary tract infections.

One advantage of SGLT2 inhibitors is that they work independently of insulin injections, allowing for more freedom in combining them with other diabetes medications. People taking dapaglifozin in clinical trials also lost an average of five pounds, and experienced a slight drop in blood pressure.

The panel recommendation will not only likely result in the FDA rejecting the diabetes medication, but it will also effect the approval of similar SGLT2 inhibitors being developed by a number of other major pharmaceutical companies, including Johnson & Johnson, GlaxoSmithKline, Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly.

The panel is calling for more clinical studies of the proposed diabetes drug. The FDA will make a final decision by the end of October, 2011, but given the panel's request for more trials, the approval of dapaglifozin is expected to be about two years away.

Diabetes Drug Metformin Combined with Exercise Has Surprise Effect on Glucose Control

August 22nd, 2011

It's common enough for researchers to look at the impacts of prescribed drugs on the body. And if you're a diabetes researcher who believes that exercise has great benefits for those with type 2 diabetes, you're hoping your research will show that. But when Normand Boulé looked at the dual impacts of exercise and metformin - two of the most commonly-prescribed modalities for glucose control -the hoped-for double whammy wasn't the result.

Researchers looking at the effects of the oral diabetes medication metformin and exercise in Type 2 diabetes patients found that a combination of these modalities didn't lower glucose control as much as hoped. Surprisingly, study participants showed better glucose control when sedentary. Researchers think that because prescription metformin and exercise both act to lower glucose levels, the combination may have triggered a counter regulatory response by the body to prevent glucose levels dipping too much.

Read the full article on ScienceDaily-

Diabetes Drug Metformin Combined with Exercise Has Surprise Effect on Glucose Control

August 22nd, 2011

It's common enough for researchers to look at the impacts of prescribed drugs on the body. And if you're a diabetes researcher who believes that exercise has great benefits for those with type 2 diabetes, you're hoping your research will show that. But when Normand Boulé looked at the dual impacts of exercise and metformin - two of the most commonly-prescribed modalities for glucose control -the hoped-for double whammy wasn't the result.

Researchers looking at the effects of the oral diabetes medication metformin and exercise in Type 2 diabetes patients found that a combination of these modalities didn't lower glucose control as much as hoped. Surprisingly, study participants showed better glucose control when sedentary. Researchers think that because prescription metformin and exercise both act to lower glucose levels, the combination may have triggered a counter regulatory response by the body to prevent glucose levels dipping too much.

Read the full article on ScienceDaily-

Edible Film a Possible Insulin Delivery Platform

September 22nd, 2011

In another promising development in the world of diabetes medication, the specialty pharmaceutical company MonoSol Rx is testing its unique PharmFilm as a possible oral insulin delivery platform. PharmFilm is a quick-dissolving film that can be impregnated with medication and placed under the tongue or against the inside of the cheek. The medication is quickly absorbed into the bloodstream through the mouth's mucosal membranes.

The FDA has already approved two applications of the edible film - Zuplenz to treat nausea and vomiting, and Suboxone to treat opiod dependence. MonoSol Rx is now testing two new applications for PharmFilm, one dispenses a drug to treat ADHD, and the other delivers insulin for diabetics.

Currently, insulin can only be administered through injection, as it is destroyed by acids in the digestive system. Because the postage stamp sized insulin film dissolves so quickly in the mouth, the diabetes medication bypasses the digestive tract and passes directly into the circulatory system.

MonoSol Rx and Midatech are just two of many companies racing to develop different ways to administer insulin without injections, including insulin patches, insulin inhalers, and insulin nasal sprays.

The insulin film can be manufactured in different sizes to accommodate different insulin dosages. The advantages of a dissolving insulin film for insulin dependent diabetics (especially children with diabetes and their caregivers) are obvious - no insulin injections; precise insulin dosing; a convenient, discreet and portable medication, and instant onset of action.

MonoSol Rx is collaborating with Midatech Group Ltd, a leading edge nanotechnology company which develops biocompatible nanoparticles (tiny synthetic molecules that are designed to carry and deliver drugs) to bring the oral diabetes medication to market. The insulin film has been successfully tested transbuccally (inside the cheek) in pigs and monkeys, and the partners plan to begin human trials this year.

A spokesperson for Midatech Group said, "The results of insulin PharmFilm in our primate study validate the film delivery of active insulin across the buccal mucosa for the first time. In addition, we have preclinical proof-of-concept that these results can be achieved in a controlled dose precisely tailored to suit individual needs. We anticipate results from our human clinical trials, slated to commence in the second quarter of 2011, to revolutionize treatment methods and insulin delivery for diabetics worldwide."

According to the Centers for Disease Control, nearly 24 million people in the United States are currently living with diabetes - the seventh leading cause of death in the country. Many of these diabetics (about 30%) are, or will become, insulin dependent and require insulin injections. Many are struggling with complications involving their heart, kidneys, nerves, eyes, and circulation.

Insulin is a hormone which moves blood sugar into the cells to give the body energy. Diabetics either don't produce any insulin (type 1 diabetes), can't make enough insulin, and/or can't properly make use of the little insulin they do produce (type 2 diabetes).

Edible Film a Possible Insulin Delivery Platform

September 22nd, 2011

In another promising development in the world of diabetes medication, the specialty pharmaceutical company MonoSol Rx is testing its unique PharmFilm as a possible oral insulin delivery platform. PharmFilm is a quick-dissolving film that can be impregnated with medication and placed under the tongue or against the inside of the cheek. The medication is quickly absorbed into the bloodstream through the mouth's mucosal membranes.

The FDA has already approved two applications of the edible film - Zuplenz to treat nausea and vomiting, and Suboxone to treat opiod dependence. MonoSol Rx is now testing two new applications for PharmFilm, one dispenses a drug to treat ADHD, and the other delivers insulin for diabetics.

Currently, insulin can only be administered through injection, as it is destroyed by acids in the digestive system. Because the postage stamp sized insulin film dissolves so quickly in the mouth, the diabetes medication bypasses the digestive tract and passes directly into the circulatory system.

MonoSol Rx and Midatech are just two of many companies racing to develop different ways to administer insulin without injections, including insulin patches, insulin inhalers, and insulin nasal sprays.

The insulin film can be manufactured in different sizes to accommodate different insulin dosages. The advantages of a dissolving insulin film for insulin dependent diabetics (especially children with diabetes and their caregivers) are obvious - no insulin injections; precise insulin dosing; a convenient, discreet and portable medication, and instant onset of action.

MonoSol Rx is collaborating with Midatech Group Ltd, a leading edge nanotechnology company which develops biocompatible nanoparticles (tiny synthetic molecules that are designed to carry and deliver drugs) to bring the oral diabetes medication to market. The insulin film has been successfully tested transbuccally (inside the cheek) in pigs and monkeys, and the partners plan to begin human trials this year.

A spokesperson for Midatech Group said, "The results of insulin PharmFilm in our primate study validate the film delivery of active insulin across the buccal mucosa for the first time. In addition, we have preclinical proof-of-concept that these results can be achieved in a controlled dose precisely tailored to suit individual needs. We anticipate results from our human clinical trials, slated to commence in the second quarter of 2011, to revolutionize treatment methods and insulin delivery for diabetics worldwide."

According to the Centers for Disease Control, nearly 24 million people in the United States are currently living with diabetes - the seventh leading cause of death in the country. Many of these diabetics (about 30%) are, or will become, insulin dependent and require insulin injections. Many are struggling with complications involving their heart, kidneys, nerves, eyes, and circulation.

Insulin is a hormone which moves blood sugar into the cells to give the body energy. Diabetics either don't produce any insulin (type 1 diabetes), can't make enough insulin, and/or can't properly make use of the little insulin they do produce (type 2 diabetes).

FDA Approves First Combo Drug for Diabetes And High Cholesterol

October 7th, 2011

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Juvisync (sitagliptin and simvastatin), a fixed-dose combination (FDC) prescription medication that contains two previously approved medicines in one tablet for use in adults who need both sitagliptin and simvastatin.

About 20 million people in the United States have type 2 diabetes, and they often have high cholesterol levels as well. These conditions can lead to increased risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and blindness, among other chronic conditions, particularly if left untreated or poorly treated.

Sitagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitor that enhances the body's own ability to lower elevated blood sugar and is approved for use in combination with diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. Simvastatin is an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, or statin, approved for use with diet and exercise to reduce the amount of "bad cholesterol" (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol or LDL-C) in the blood.

"This is the first product to combine a type 2 diabetes drug with a cholesterol lowering drug in one tablet," said Mary H. Parks, M.D., director of the Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology Products in the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. "However, to ensure safe and effective use of this product, tablets containing different doses of sitagliptin and simvastatin in fixed-dose combination have been developed to meet the different needs of individual patients. Dose selection should factor in what other drugs the patient is taking."

This FDC is based on substantial experience with both sitagliptin and simvastatin, and the ability of the single tablet to deliver similar amounts of the drugs to the bloodstream as when sitagliptin and simvastatin are taken separately. Juvisync is a convenience combination and should only be prescribed when it is appropriate for a patient to be placed on both of these drugs.

Juvisync was approved in dosage strengths for sitagliptin/simvastatin of 100 mg/10 mg, 100 mg/20 mg and 100 mg/40 mg. The company has committed to develop FDC tablets with the sitagliptin 50 mg dose, as Juvisync 50 mg/10 mg, 50 mg/20 mg and 50 mg/40 mg. Pending availability of the FDC tablets containing 50 mg of sitagliptin, patients who require this dose should continue to use the single ingredient sitagliptin tablet. There is no plan to develop FDCs with the sitagliptin 25 mg dose as use of this dose is quite low.

Simvastatin is currently marketed in dosage strengths of 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 mg. Due to recent restrictions placed on the use of the 80 mg dose because of a higher risk of muscle toxicity, there will not be a FDC using this dose. There is also no plan to develop FDCs with the simvastatin 5 mg dose as use of this dose is quite low as well.

The FDA has recently become aware of the potential for statins to increase blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. This risk appears very small and is outweighed by the benefits of statins for reducing heart disease in diabetes. However, the prescribing information for Juvisync will inform doctors of this possible side effect. The company will also be required to conduct a post-marketing clinical trial comparing the glucose lowering ability of sitagliptin alone compared to sitagliptin given with simvastatin.

Juvisync is approved with a Medication Guide that provides important information to patients. The most common side effects of Juvisync include upper respiratory infection; stuffy or runny nose and sore throat; headache; muscle and stomach pain; constipation; and nausea. Juvisync is manufactured by MSD International GmbH Clonmel, Co. in Tipperary, Ireland.

The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation's food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.

Chewable Oral Diabetes Medication Enters Clinical Testing

October 12th, 2011

diabetes medication

Boston Therapeutics, Inc., a developer of diabetes therapeutics, announced the initiation of its first clinical trial of its investigational diabetes medication, PAZ320, when added to other oral diabetes medication or insulin injections in patients with type 2 diabetes. Boston Therapeutics is a leader in the specialized field of glyco-pathology, focused on understanding the importance of carbohydrates in biochemistry and the progression of diseases.

"We have already seen significant reduction of post-meal elevation of glucose in preclinical models with PAZ320," said David Platt, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer of Boston Therapeutics. "We are excited about our collaboration with endocrinologist Dr. Sushela Chaidarun, PhD. and Dr. Laura E. Trask at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, and the possibility to help millions of people with high blood sugar and diabetes."

PAZ320 is a chewable complex carbohydrate-based compound designed to reduce the post-meal elevation of blood glucose. A proprietary polysaccharide designed to be taken before meals, it works in the gastrointestinal system, blocking the action of the carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes that break carbohydrates down into glucose and release it into the bloodstream.

This clinical study will evaluate the safety and efficacy of PAZ320 when added to oral diabetes medications or insulin injections. The study population will consist of adults aged 18-75 years with type 2 diabetes, either on oral agents or insulin with a BMI of 25-35 kg/m2 and with A1c of less than 9.0%. The study will be conducted at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in New Hampshire - one of America's oldest and most respected medical schools

"Given the many complications that stem from uncontrolled diabetes, it is important to implement measures that will better control glucose levels throughout the day," said Dr. Trask, Co-Principal Investigator of the study, along with Dr. Chaidarun. "By providing another way to appropriately control the postprandial glucose increase following a meal, diabetics may better control their glucose level."

Boston Therapeutics has also developed SUGARDOWN, a chewable complex carbohydrate-based dietary supplement that is taken before carbohydrate-containing meals to reduce the absorption of glucose from the intestinal tract and moderate post-meal blood glucose.

Chewable Oral Diabetes Medication Enters Clinical Testing

October 12th, 2011

diabetes medication

Boston Therapeutics, Inc., a developer of diabetes therapeutics, announced the initiation of its first clinical trial of its investigational diabetes medication, PAZ320, when added to other oral diabetes medication or insulin injections in patients with type 2 diabetes. Boston Therapeutics is a leader in the specialized field of glyco-pathology, focused on understanding the importance of carbohydrates in biochemistry and the progression of diseases.

"We have already seen significant reduction of post-meal elevation of glucose in preclinical models with PAZ320," said David Platt, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer of Boston Therapeutics. "We are excited about our collaboration with endocrinologist Dr. Sushela Chaidarun, PhD. and Dr. Laura E. Trask at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, and the possibility to help millions of people with high blood sugar and diabetes."

PAZ320 is a chewable complex carbohydrate-based compound designed to reduce the post-meal elevation of blood glucose. A proprietary polysaccharide designed to be taken before meals, it works in the gastrointestinal system, blocking the action of the carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes that break carbohydrates down into glucose and release it into the bloodstream.

This clinical study will evaluate the safety and efficacy of PAZ320 when added to oral diabetes medications or insulin injections. The study population will consist of adults aged 18-75 years with type 2 diabetes, either on oral agents or insulin with a BMI of 25-35 kg/m2 and with A1c of less than 9.0%. The study will be conducted at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in New Hampshire - one of America's oldest and most respected medical schools

"Given the many complications that stem from uncontrolled diabetes, it is important to implement measures that will better control glucose levels throughout the day," said Dr. Trask, Co-Principal Investigator of the study, along with Dr. Chaidarun. "By providing another way to appropriately control the postprandial glucose increase following a meal, diabetics may better control their glucose level."

Boston Therapeutics has also developed SUGARDOWN, a chewable complex carbohydrate-based dietary supplement that is taken before carbohydrate-containing meals to reduce the absorption of glucose from the intestinal tract and moderate post-meal blood glucose.

Diabetes Drug May Help with Cancer

April 10th, 2012

According to a new study, the common diabetes drug metformin may be also used to treat cancer. Metformin is most commonly known as Glucophage, an oral glucose medication. It is often combined with other medications, each with the same basic function, to control blood sugar levels for diabetics.

Researchers say that this discovery may affect people with prostate cancer, melanoma, pancreatic or lung cancer. They administered metformin in addition to the patients' regular treatments, and had positive results. They noticed definite differences between patients treated only with tumor suppressants and patients who received tumor suppressants supplemented by metformin.

The best breakthrough with this research is that metformin is one of the least expensive diabetes medications. It ups the fighting power of tumor suppressants without significantly raising the price of cancer treatments. Cancer medications are already expensive, and with the addition of metformin, patients may not need to pay for them for as long.

If you are diabetic, or your doctor has recommended adding metformin to your cancer treatment, consider buying online. You can buy Glucophage online for significantly less from a Canadian pharmacy than an American one.