Consider an Online Canadian Pharmacy When You Buy Lantus

June 30th, 2011

Lantus is a popular basal, or long acting, insulin used in the treatment of both type 1 and type 1 diabetes mellitus. The diabetes medication is suitable for both adult and pediatric patients with Type 1 diabetes, and for adults with Type 2 diabetes who require long-acting insulin injections to control hyperglycemia.

Lantus long acting insulin has some key benefits: it is used only once daily, it has no pronounced peak; it lowers basal glucose levels for a full 24 hours; and it can be used with oral diabetes medications and/or short-acting insulin for better diabetes control. One of the biggest advantages of Lantus is that, due to its lack of peak, it decreases the risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia.

Lantus (insulin glargine), marketed by Sanofi-Aventis, currently leads the long acting insulin market, generating sales of almost $4 billion a year globally. Lantus is available in both conventional vials and the discreet and convenient pre-filled Lantus SoloSTAR insulin pen.

Many diabetics help manage the cost of daily insulin injections by buying their diabetes medication from a Canadian online pharmacy. The Canadian government regulates prescription drug prices, and does not allow pharmaceutical companies to engage in expensive direct to consumer marketing, helping to keep drug prices lower.

The Canadian government also allows drug companies to manufacturer cheaper (but chemically identical) generic versions of brand name drugs sooner than in the States. Canadian pharmacies are anticipating they will be able to provide their customers with affordable generic Lantus in the near future, so revisit longactinginsulin.com for updates.

It is not uncommon for a prescription purchased through a Canadian online pharmacy to be 50% cheaper than one purchased in the US, and not unheard of for it to be up to 90% cheaper. To buy Janumet online from a Canadian pharmacy, you must have a current valid prescription.

Be sure you are dealing with a reputable online Canada pharmacy by ensuring it does not offer drugs without a prescription, does not sell controlled substances such as narcotics, has clear contact information including a physical address, has a licensed pharmacist available to answer questions, and is accredited by the Canadian International Pharmacy Association.

Like all types of insulin, Lantus is only part of a complete program of diabetes treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, and regular blood sugar monitoring. Any decisions about your diabetes medication should be made together with your doctor or another health care professional.

Insulin Jet Injectors Evolving

September 12th, 2011

Despite lackluster success to date, the market research firm Kalorama is predicting that the worldwide market for jet injectors will double over the next five years. Jet injectors are a needleless drug delivery system that distribute a fine jet of medication under such high pressure that it is able to penetrate the skin.

"Needle-free devices have come a long way to the present state and are playing an increasingly important role in the novel drug delivery technology markets," Kalorama drug delivery analyst Mary Anne Crandall wrote in a report titled Needle-Free Drug Delivery Markets. She predicts that their ease of use, safety and cost effectiveness, combined with evolving technology, will result in a future boom in jet injector sales.

"Needle free has been a part of insulin marketing for some time," says Crandall, "And now we are also seeing it with vaccines and [other] treatments." There are now over a dozen FDA approved needle-free jet injectors on the market, most designed for specific purposes such as administering vaccines, delivering hormone treatments, and administering growth hormone to children.

Bioject's VitaJet has traditionally been marketed as an insulin jet injector, although it is now being promoted for other home injection applications. There are insulin jet injectors specially designed for children, and even one for dogs and cats, the Zoe Pet Jet.

There are still some limitations to widespread usage of jet injectors. For example, jet injectors can't efficiently administer drugs intramuscularly. They are well suited to delivering subcutaneous insulin doses, but existing jet injectors are cumbersome compared to an insulin syringe or insulin pen, and require maintenance.

Currently, cost is also an issue, although Crandall believes prices will erode in the near future, spurring further sales. While initially expensive, jet injectors are designed to last for years. The pressurized gas cartridges needed to power many jet injectors (others use a spring loaded device) are an ongoing expense.

The number one issue may be discomfort. Although some diabetics find a needleless insulin injection quite tolerable, many find the pressure required to force the insulin through the skin painful. Some report bruising, swelling and even bleeding at the injection site, although that may be the result of an incorrect injector setting.

There are some obvious benefits to a needle free jet injection system, the most apparent being the option for the needle phobic to avoid needles. Other advantages are the speed and ease of use, safety (no bent or broken needles, or "sharps" to dispose of ), less risk of contamination, a better spread of insulin into the subcutaneous tissue, no scar tissue build up at the injection site, and no need to keep buying syringes.

"Needle-free jet injection devices can and should play a major role in solving the problems of needle stick injuries and needle phobia in the United States," according to Crandall. With the industry aware of and working on the drawbacks of the promising drug delivery devices, Crandall is probably right.