New Diabetic Treatment - Artificial Pancreas

March 5th, 2012

Clinical trials are currently being run for a treatment that may change the lives of diabetics. Instead of scheduled blood sugar checks, diabetics with an artificial pancreas can sleep through the whole night. The artificial pancreas is designed to digitally monitor a patients glucose levels and adjust them when the get too high or too low.

When it becomes main stream, the bionic pancreas will be about the size of a cell phone, but for clinical trials the patients are hooked up to laptops. The device uses algorithms to determine how much insulin is needed and at which time. There are two parts under the skin, one to detect the patients' glucose levels, and the other to inject the appropriate amount of insulin, or if necessary, the bionic pancreas can also inject Glucagon, a medication designed to rapidly raise dangerously low blood sugar levels.

The trials are currently only for adults and children in hospitals. For safety reasons, they are constantly monitored. The researchers are hoping to have this product on the market in the coming years, with patients being fitted with their artificial pancreas, monitored, and then sent home, no longer having to worry about lancets, insulin injections or what/how much they are eating.

Until the artificial pancreas has passed many more obstacles and testing, diabetics will have to continue their medication and monitoring regimens. In order to make it slightly easier, doctors may recommend that you buy Januvia, or other medications for type 2 diabetes to help regulate your blood sugar. .

Surgery May Reverse Effects of Diabetes

March 30th, 2012

Two new studies have been published stating that gastric bypass surgery may be a useful new tool in diabetes treatment. The results of the two studies show that the surgery drastically reduces the symptoms of diabetes, or in some patients, it disappears altogether. Doctors are unsure why exactly this surgery works so well for Type 2 diabetes sufferers, but some believe it is due to hormone changes. This surgery is only available for diabetic patients with a body mass index of 35 or higher.

A typical woman has a body mass index between 19 and 25. According to researchers on the study, one diabetic woman who underwent the surgery now only uses 10 milligrams of insulin per day; she was taking nine times that pre-surgery. Unfortunately gastric bypass surgery doesn't have the same effect on Type 1 diabetics. This is due to their fundamental differences. Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune disorder, whereas type 2 is generally a complication of obesity. While the pounds melt off, so do the symptoms of diabetes.

Gastric bypass surgery uses a band to segregate the stomach into two pouches. The doctors then reattach the small intestine to the upper half of the stomach, which is now significantly smaller. Bariatric surgeons typically only perform this type of surgery on someone who is morbidly obese, which is a body mass index or 40 or more. They will also perform gastric bypass on a patient with a body mass index of 35, if they also have a 'co-morbid condition' such as diabetes.

If you are not currently accepted for this type of surgery, you will have to control your diabetes using long acting insulins such as Lantus or Levemir. We recommend that you buy anti-diabetes medications online, at a Canadian pharmacy. This will significantly reduce the financial burden caused by a long term disease such as diabetes.

To see the original release, click here.

Surgery May Reverse Effects of Diabetes

March 30th, 2012

Two new studies have been published stating that gastric bypass surgery may be a useful new tool in diabetes treatment. The results of the two studies show that the surgery drastically reduces the symptoms of diabetes, or in some patients, it disappears altogether. Doctors are unsure why exactly this surgery works so well for Type 2 diabetes sufferers, but some believe it is due to hormone changes. This surgery is only available for diabetic patients with a body mass index of 35 or higher.

A typical woman has a body mass index between 19 and 25. According to researchers on the study, one diabetic woman who underwent the surgery now only uses 10 milligrams of insulin per day; she was taking nine times that pre-surgery. Unfortunately gastric bypass surgery doesn't have the same effect on Type 1 diabetics. This is due to their fundamental differences. Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune disorder, whereas type 2 is generally a complication of obesity. While the pounds melt off, so do the symptoms of diabetes.

Gastric bypass surgery uses a band to segregate the stomach into two pouches. The doctors then reattach the small intestine to the upper half of the stomach, which is now significantly smaller. Bariatric surgeons typically only perform this type of surgery on someone who is morbidly obese, which is a body mass index or 40 or more. They will also perform gastric bypass on a patient with a body mass index of 35, if they also have a 'co-morbid condition' such as diabetes.

If you are not currently accepted for this type of surgery, you will have to control your diabetes using long acting insulins such as Lantus or Levemir. We recommend that you buy anti-diabetes medications online, at a Canadian pharmacy. This will significantly reduce the financial burden caused by a long term disease such as diabetes.

To see the original release, click here.

7 Easy Ways to Slash Your Diabetes Risk

August 28th, 2012

New research from Women's Health Magazine finds you can slash your diabetes risk by following these healthy tips:

1. Hit the Weights. Upping your lean muscle mass could lower your insulin resistance, and drop your odds of developing pre-diabetes. Or every 10-percent increase in muscle mass, your pre-diabetes risk fell by 12-percent. Aim for at least two and a half hours a week of glucose-burning cardio activity -- like running, cycling, or swimming.

2. Score Enough Sleep. Long-term sleep deprivation may amp up the body's insulin resistance, especially in people genetically predisposed to diabetes. Those who regularly snoozed fewer than six hours a night were at the highest risk. Try to get at least seven hours of shut-eye each evening.

3. Fiber up. The rough stuff isn't just good for digestion; it also curbs post-meal sugar spikes by slowing down the flow of glucose into the bloodstream. So when you crave something sweet, opt for fiber-rich fruits like raspberries or pears. And consider adding brown rice to your diet because it lowers your diabetes risk by 11%.

4. Chill Out. When your body senses stress, it releases hormones that increase blood sugar. Regularly practicing deep breathing or meditation, listening to calming music, or getting massages can quell stress hormones and help lower overall blood sugar.

5. Embrace the Omegas. The omega-3 fatty acids found in foods like oily fish, can help improve insulin sensitivity. Eat at least one serving of this kind of seafood a week.

6. Do the D. The "sunshine vitamin" may be a key factor in the fight against diabetes. A review published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism found that people with high vitamin-D levels were less likely to develop type 2. Swallow 1,000 to 2,000 IU a day through dairy foods, fatty fish, or supplements.

7. Spice Things Up. Cinnamon may be an ace at lowering blood sugar levels, says research in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. Rich in nutrients called polyphenols, the sweet spice may help insulin do its job more effectively. Sprinkle some into your morning joe or mix it into an oatmeal snack.

Diabetes is a serious chronic disease but that can be managed through lifestyle changes and medications such as generic Glucophage 850mg.

Treating Hypertension in Patients with Diabetes

May 29th, 2013

Hypertension, otherwise known as high blood pressure is an extremely common condition in diabetes affecting 20 to 60% of patients. Ethnicity, age and obesity are the factors that determine the prevalence of this condition.

Reasons why treatment of hypertension in diabetics is important.

Hypertension has been found to increase the risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications in diabetics.

Microvascular complications

1. Renal disease

Hypertension has been found to contribute to renal disease in patients with diabetes.

2. Autonomic neuropathy sexual dysfunction

Anti- hypertensive therapy and hypertension contribute independently to sexual dysfunction in diabetics.

3. Orthostatic hypotension

Due to autonomic dysfunction, supine hypertension with orthostatic hypotension can occur. Therefore, blood pressure should be measured while either sitting or standing.

4. Eye disease

The risk of having conditions such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy which has the potential to cause total blindness is increased by hypertension.

Macrovascular complications

1. Cardiac disease

The risk of developing congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease and cardiomyopathy increases exponentially due to hypertension.

2. Cerebrovascular disease

Getting a stroke is far more likely for diabetic patients with hypertension. Survival and recovery rates are also lowered as compared to people who do not have diabetes.

3. Peripheral vascular disease

Foot ulcers and the risk of amputation is higher in patients with diabetes suffering from hypertension.

How to treat hypertension in diabetics?

It has been found that restricted sodium and a higher potassium intake is beneficial in lowering blood pressure.

However, this strategy alone is insufficient when it comes to attaining the levels recommended for diabetics. Medications are far more helpful and act faster than a change in diet. Some of these include;

ACE INHIBITORS

Patients who have had congestive heart failure or a myocardial infarction have benefited greatly from ACE inhibitors. It is also beneficial to those who have had renal failure due to complications of diabetes.

This is the preferred therapy for diabetics with hypertension according to the World Health Organization among others. Drug trials have shown a 20 -30% decrease in the risk of heart failure, strokes and major cardiovascular complications. They also increase insulin sensitivity.

Diuretics

Several studies have shown that diuretics are an important basis for antihypertensive treatment. Combined with agents that inhibit the renin-angiotensin system, diuretics reduce the level of micro albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Various anti-hypertensive drugs may be used but diuretics are an important factor in their effectiveness and many in-expensive generic diuretics are available.

Combination Therapy

Most diabetics with hypertension require more than one form of therapy to maintain the recommended levels of blood pressure.

ACE inhibitors and CCB's have been found to reduce cardiovascular events. ACE inhibitors and beta blockers have the potential to lower blood pressure.

Conclusion

High levels of blood glucose have been found to increase the incidence of vascular damage and abnormal vascular structure which makes patients more vulnerable to high blood pressure.

People with diabetes should have lower than normal blood pressure to reduce the risk of complications due to diabetes.