Diabetize Your Favorite Recipes

March 23rd, 2011

Part of the challenge of living with diabetes is eating well without feeling deprived. The American Diabetes Association has some helpful tips to "diabetize" your favorite family recipes so they can remain part of your lifestyle. Among their suggestions:

1) Reduce sodium.

2) Reduce saturated fat.

3) Pump up the vegetables.

4) Increase fiber.

5) Reduce portion size

Click here for the full post >American Diabetes Association.<

Diabetic Friendly Pita Chips

April 29th, 2011

DiabeticLifestyle.com has upgraded its website to provide even more advice and information on living and thriving with diabetes. Here's a recipe for diabetic friendly pita chips courtesy of the new site:

Baked Pita Chips

Servings: 12

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 5 minutes

Total: 10 minutes

Ingredients:

? 6 6-inch pita breads

? cooking spray

? Mrs. Dash or various spices to taste

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 375F.

2. With a sharp knife, cut each pita bread into 6 wedges. Gently pull apart each triangle to separate it into 2 pieces, getting 12 triangles per pita bread.

3. Lay the triangles in a single layer on a large non-stick baking sheet. You can use parchment paper, if you want. (Depending on the size of your baking sheet, you make need to bake them in two batches.)

4. Lightly coat triangles with cooking spray and sprinkle on spices.

5. Bake for about 7 minutes, until pita begins to color. Turn pitas over and continue to bake until crisp and golden brown (about another 5 minutes).

6. Store in airtight containers. Terrific with guacamole or hummus.

Nutrition Information

Per 6 Chip Serving:

83 calories (4% calories from fat)

0 total fat (0 saturated fat)

3 g protein

17 g carbohydrates

1 g dietary fiber

0 cholesterol

161 mg sodium

36 mg potassium

Diabetic Exchanges: 1 carbohydrate

Diabetic Friendly Pita Chips

April 29th, 2011

DiabeticLifestyle.com has upgraded its website to provide even more advice and information on living and thriving with diabetes. Here's a recipe for diabetic friendly pita chips courtesy of the new site:

Baked Pita Chips

Servings: 12

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 5 minutes

Total: 10 minutes

Ingredients:

? 6 6-inch pita breads

? cooking spray

? Mrs. Dash or various spices to taste

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 375F.

2. With a sharp knife, cut each pita bread into 6 wedges. Gently pull apart each triangle to separate it into 2 pieces, getting 12 triangles per pita bread.

3. Lay the triangles in a single layer on a large non-stick baking sheet. You can use parchment paper, if you want. (Depending on the size of your baking sheet, you make need to bake them in two batches.)

4. Lightly coat triangles with cooking spray and sprinkle on spices.

5. Bake for about 7 minutes, until pita begins to color. Turn pitas over and continue to bake until crisp and golden brown (about another 5 minutes).

6. Store in airtight containers. Terrific with guacamole or hummus.

Nutrition Information

Per 6 Chip Serving:

83 calories (4% calories from fat)

0 total fat (0 saturated fat)

3 g protein

17 g carbohydrates

1 g dietary fiber

0 cholesterol

161 mg sodium

36 mg potassium

Diabetic Exchanges: 1 carbohydrate

Nutrition and Diabetes Control

May 25th, 2011

woman grocery shopping

Nutrition is vitally important in diabetes management and blood sugar control. About.com's Nutrition and Diabetes page editors have compiled a wealth of information on healthy eating for diabetics including facts on carbs, calories, fiber and the all-important glycemic index; advice on surviving restaurant meals and holiday dinners, and even diabetes-friendly recipes and meal plans.

For those with an interest in alternative approaches, the Nutrition and Diabetes page also provides information on less conventional diets such as vegetarian, raw food and vegan. Other articles give you the lowdown on foods believed to have a positive affect on blood sugar and insulin resistance, such as fenugreek, prickly pear cactus and omega 3 fatty acids.

There are articles on sugar substitutes and hidden sugars, and nutrition facts and carb and calorie counts for individual foods like avocados, pomegranates, eggplant and watermelon (warning - very high carb!). The page also links to articles with recommendations for losing weight, specific diet tips for those with kidney disease, and even advice on healthy eating on a budget.

When making any major changes to your diet and/or activity levels, bear in mind they may impact your blood sugar levels and need for diabetes medication. Consult your healthcare provider about possible changes to your insulin dosage or other diabetes medicine.

To view About.com's Nutrition and Diabetes page, >CLICK HERE.<

Diabetic Cookie Recipe

June 23rd, 2011

diabetic cookies

1 1/2 cups unsweetened applesauce

3/4 cup margarine

2 eggs

1 tbsp. vanilla

1/3 cup brown sugar substitute, suitable for baking

2 cups oatmeal

1 tbsp. cinnamon

1/2 tsp. allspice

1 1/2 cup flour

1 1/2 tsp. soda

1/2 tsp. salt

1 cup raisins

1/4 cup nuts

Mix applesauce, margarine, eggs, vanilla and brown sugar substitute well; add the remaining ingredients. Drop by teaspoonfuls onto a cookie sheet and bake at 375 degrees for 15 minutes.

Healthy eating is crucial to diabetes control. But being diabetic doesn't mean you can never enjoy something sweet. The above recipe is courtesy of Sugar-Free.org Diabetic Recipes. Visit the site for an entire library of diabetic recipes, along with helpful tips, news and advice for diabetics.

Diabetic Cookie Recipe

June 23rd, 2011

diabetic cookies

1 1/2 cups unsweetened applesauce

3/4 cup margarine

2 eggs

1 tbsp. vanilla

1/3 cup brown sugar substitute, suitable for baking

2 cups oatmeal

1 tbsp. cinnamon

1/2 tsp. allspice

1 1/2 cup flour

1 1/2 tsp. soda

1/2 tsp. salt

1 cup raisins

1/4 cup nuts

Mix applesauce, margarine, eggs, vanilla and brown sugar substitute well; add the remaining ingredients. Drop by teaspoonfuls onto a cookie sheet and bake at 375 degrees for 15 minutes.

Healthy eating is crucial to diabetes control. But being diabetic doesn't mean you can never enjoy something sweet. The above recipe is courtesy of Sugar-Free.org Diabetic Recipes. Visit the site for an entire library of diabetic recipes, along with helpful tips, news and advice for diabetics.

How Sweet it is - a New Sugar for Diabetics

October 3rd, 2012

Coconut Palm Sugar has been making headlines lately as a low glycemic alternative to cane sugar. This delicious sweetener has been used in traditional Southeast Asian cuisine for thousands of years but is a relative newcomer to the US market. It has been touted as nutrient rich (yes you read that correctly) natural sweetener with an extremely low glycemic index in comparison with traditional sugars such as white and brown sugar. This is great news for diabetics who need to manage their blood glucose levels. A new medication, Januvia is a once-daily pill prescribed to treat diabetes and lower blood sugar level.

Coconut Palm Sugar has a Glycemic Index (GI) rating of 35 whereas cane sugars, both brown and white have a GI rating of 68. Coconut Palm Sugar's Glycemic Index even measures lower than agave nectar at 42, and honey at 55! Coconut Palm Sugar is also said to be high in Potassium, Magnesium, Zinc and Iron as well as B-Vitamins 1, 2, 3 and 6. Compared with brown sugar, Coconut Palm Sugar has 36 times more iron, 4 times more magnesium, and over 10 times the amount of zinc!

While it shouldn't be considered a "health food" per se, it is a healthier alternative to traditional sweeteners and a more natural alternative to artificial sweeteners such as sucralose. Its slow energy release also makes it a great alternative for diabetics who would like to enjoy an occasional sweet treat. Coconut Palm Sugar is produced from the sap of flower buds cut from a coconut palm tree. The sap is collected and then heated to evaporate its moisture content. It is then further reduced to create crystals, and then packaged and sold in small bags at your local health food store or natural grocery store. It can even be found in the natural foods section of some larger grocery store chains.

It is similar in appearance to brown sugar but has a much more complex taste. It has been described as tasting similar to brown sugar but with a slight caramel or butterscotch flavor. It's warm, rich flavor tastes great as a sweetener in coffee or tea, and can be used as a one to one replacement for both white and brown sugar in recipes. Its granulated crystals are quite large, but it can be powdered down in a blender or food processor when a more delicate sugar is needed.

Lisa's Coconut Palm Sugar, Apple Berry Crisp

Filling:

2 baking apples, peeled, cored and sliced thin

3 cups of mixed berries (blueberries, raspberries, black berries), fresh or frozen

1 tablespoon cornstarch

2 tablespoons pure maple syrup

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

2 teaspoons cinnamon

Topping:

1 cups rolled oats (not quick cooking)

cup all purpose flour

cup coconut palm sugar

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

cup butter softened (can be replaced with coconut oil for a healthier alternative)

Pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Place all filling ingredients into an 11 x 7 inch pan. Gently stir to combine.

In a medium mixing bowl add rolled oats, flour, coconut palm sugar, cinnamon and salt. Stir to combine. Add vanilla extract and then butter using a fork or your hands to combine. Crumble topping evenly over filling.

Bake for 40 minutes until the filling is bubbly and the topping is golden brown.

Enjoy warm from the oven.