Insulin Therapy Can Help Avoid Diabetic Neuropathy

May 19th, 2011

Diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, especially in those who have had diabetes for some time. Diabetic neuropathy, or nerve pain, is nerve damage related to high blood sugar levels. Up to 70 percent of diabetics will develop some sort of neuropathy.

There are four types of diabetic neuropathy - peripheral, proximal, autonomic and focal. The symptoms will vary depending on the type you have, but the first signs are usually numbness, tingling and/or pain in the outer limbs - hands, feet, legs and arms.

Peripheral neuropathy is the most common type. Symptoms get worse at night, and include muscle pain and cramping, loss of sensitivity to temperature or pain, and increased sensitivity to touch. Uncontrolled peripheral neuropathy increases the risk of foot ulcers, infection, and even amputation.

The one and only way to treat diabetic neuropathy is to control your blood sugar levels. A major long-term study established that neuropathy was less common in those diabetics controlling their condition through insulin injections. For a comprehensive overview of diabetic neuropathy, including tips on how to prevent and control it, read The Complete Guide to Diabetic Neuropathy at endocrineweb.

Weird Warning for Diabetics With Pets

June 24th, 2011

Jack Russell terrier

The Director of the Amputation Prevention Center at the Valley Presbyterian Hospital in Van Nuys, Dr. Lee C. Rogers, has a warning for diabetic pet owners who have suffered a loss of feeling due to nerve damage.

The warning stems from an incident in which a two-year-old Jack Russell terrier chewed off the infected big toe of its owner while she slept. The 48-year-old Des Moines woman woke in the morning to find part of her toe missing, and blood on her bed and her pet's face.

"She didn't feel it at all," said Rogers, a podiatrist who treated the woman, "When she woke up, there was blood all over the place." Rogers eventually had to amputate the woman's leg after she developed an infection - leaving her a double amputee.

Rogers is now cautioning diabetics who have lost feeling in their limbs to cover their feet and any wounds while sleeping. "Pets have a tendency to lick wounds, and that simple lick can turn into a bite if there is no response from its owner," warns Rogers, adding that there has also been cases of dog's saliva infecting their owners with dangerous bacteria.

About 60 to 70 percent of diabetics have some sort of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to poor diabetes control. Diabetic neuropathy results from years of high blood glucose levels, and often begins with a loss of sensation in the feet.

Diabetic neuropathy is a leading cause of amputation, although staff at the Amputation Prevention Center have achieved a limb salvage rate of 96 percent since opening its doors in January of 2010. The Center uses cutting-edge technology and a unique team approach. It recorded an average healing rate of 52 days in its 350 patients the first year, less than half the national average of 120 days.

Oddly, this is not the first known incident of this type. Last year a Michigan man with type 2 diabetes lost part of his big toe when his Jack Russell bit it off after the man passed out from a night of drinking. Doctors who treated him after the incident said they would have had to amputate the toe anyway.

Diabetic neuropathy is not an inevitable part of having diabetes. It can be avoided, or at the very least, minimized with proper diabetes control. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetics can control their condition with lifestyle changes like diet and exercise, careful blood glucose monitoring, and oral diabetes medication insulin injections if needed.

Weird Warning for Diabetics With Pets

June 24th, 2011

Jack Russell terrier

The Director of the Amputation Prevention Center at the Valley Presbyterian Hospital in Van Nuys, Dr. Lee C. Rogers, has a warning for diabetic pet owners who have suffered a loss of feeling due to nerve damage.

The warning stems from an incident in which a two-year-old Jack Russell terrier chewed off the infected big toe of its owner while she slept. The 48-year-old Des Moines woman woke in the morning to find part of her toe missing, and blood on her bed and her pet's face.

"She didn't feel it at all," said Rogers, a podiatrist who treated the woman, "When she woke up, there was blood all over the place." Rogers eventually had to amputate the woman's leg after she developed an infection - leaving her a double amputee.

Rogers is now cautioning diabetics who have lost feeling in their limbs to cover their feet and any wounds while sleeping. "Pets have a tendency to lick wounds, and that simple lick can turn into a bite if there is no response from its owner," warns Rogers, adding that there has also been cases of dog's saliva infecting their owners with dangerous bacteria.

About 60 to 70 percent of diabetics have some sort of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to poor diabetes control. Diabetic neuropathy results from years of high blood glucose levels, and often begins with a loss of sensation in the feet.

Diabetic neuropathy is a leading cause of amputation, although staff at the Amputation Prevention Center have achieved a limb salvage rate of 96 percent since opening its doors in January of 2010. The Center uses cutting-edge technology and a unique team approach. It recorded an average healing rate of 52 days in its 350 patients the first year, less than half the national average of 120 days.

Oddly, this is not the first known incident of this type. Last year a Michigan man with type 2 diabetes lost part of his big toe when his Jack Russell bit it off after the man passed out from a night of drinking. Doctors who treated him after the incident said they would have had to amputate the toe anyway.

Diabetic neuropathy is not an inevitable part of having diabetes. It can be avoided, or at the very least, minimized with proper diabetes control. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetics can control their condition with lifestyle changes like diet and exercise, careful blood glucose monitoring, and oral diabetes medication insulin injections if needed.

Researchers Invent New Drug Delivery Device to Treat Diabetes-Related Vision Loss

July 6th, 2011

ScienceDaily (2011-06-29) -- Engineers and scientists have developed a device that can be implanted behind the eye for controlled and on-demand release of drugs to treat retinal damage caused by diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of vision loss among patients with diabetes. The disease is caused by the unwanted growth of capillary cells in the retina, which in its advanced stages can result in blindness.

The novel drug delivery mechanism is detailed in the current issue of Lab on a Chip, a multidisciplinary journal on innovative microfluidic and nanofluidic technologies.

Read the full article...

Researchers Invent New Drug Delivery Device to Treat Diabetes-Related Vision Loss

July 6th, 2011

ScienceDaily (2011-06-29) -- Engineers and scientists have developed a device that can be implanted behind the eye for controlled and on-demand release of drugs to treat retinal damage caused by diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of vision loss among patients with diabetes. The disease is caused by the unwanted growth of capillary cells in the retina, which in its advanced stages can result in blindness.

The novel drug delivery mechanism is detailed in the current issue of Lab on a Chip, a multidisciplinary journal on innovative microfluidic and nanofluidic technologies.

Read the full article...

Researcher Links Diabetic Complication to Nerve Damage in Bone Marrow

August 5th, 2011

?ScienceDaily (2010-01-08) -- Scientists have discovered a link between diabetes and bone marrow nerve damage that may help treat one of the most common and potentially blindness-causing diabetes complications - diabetic retinopathy.

The key to better treating retinopathy - damage to blood vessels in the retina that affects up to 80 percent of diabetic patients - lies not in the retina but in damage to the nerves found in bone marrow that leads to the abnormal release of stem cells, said Julia Busik, an associate professor in MSU's Department of Physiology.

> read full article

Researcher Links Diabetic Complication to Nerve Damage in Bone Marrow

August 5th, 2011

?ScienceDaily (2010-01-08) -- Scientists have discovered a link between diabetes and bone marrow nerve damage that may help treat one of the most common and potentially blindness-causing diabetes complications - diabetic retinopathy.

The key to better treating retinopathy - damage to blood vessels in the retina that affects up to 80 percent of diabetic patients - lies not in the retina but in damage to the nerves found in bone marrow that leads to the abnormal release of stem cells, said Julia Busik, an associate professor in MSU's Department of Physiology.

> read full article

Steps to Healthy Diabetic Feet

March 12th, 2012

As most diabetics know, the onset set of diabetic neuropathy usually starts in the extremities, particularly the feet. Neuropathy occurs when a diabetic's high blood sugar breaks down nerves and blood vessels in the body. The feet are most often affected, as they have many tiny bloody vessels, a large nerve network, and are the farthest from the heart, therefore receiving less blood than other areas. Neuropathy often results in ulcers or a loss of feeling in the feet. This can cause permanent damage, and sometimes even requires amputation to maintain overall health. Therefore, it is incredibly important to maintain your diabetes, and keep a close eye on your feet.

Step 1: Listen to your doctor - This means maintaining communication with them, and actually doing what they ask you to do. Diabetes is a difficult condition, but it can be easier with new treatments such as Bydureon and Trajenta. Maintaining a good level of blood glucose is important for your overall health, and helps prevent the breakdown of important nerves and blood vessels.

Step 2: Daily checks - Just like looking for a breast lump, daily checks are necessary to catch a problem early. Check for sores, infected toenails, and red spots. Use a mirror if you have a hard time bending down. Another important fact is how fast cuts heal. Talk to your doctor if a cut hasn't starting healing after a day.

Step 3: Proper Shoes - Shoes with a supportive sole and a breathable shell are extremely important for a diabetic. Both of these factors help to maintain good circulation in your feet, and make exercising much easier. Remember that good shoes will also wear out after a time, so periodically check the height of the insoles, and the overall condition of the shoe. If you notice that these things are lacking, invest in new shoes. You will notice a positive difference.

Step 4: Temperature Control - Step 3 and step 4 go hand in hand, it is important, when exercising, or when sedentary, to control the temperature of your feet. Since you may not be able to feel in, touch your feet with your hands every couple of hours yto make sure they are not overheated or exceptionally warm. Both of these extreme can lead to more nerve breakdown.

Step 5: Keep Them in Motion - Remember to wiggle your toes throughout the day; particularly ladies who wear tight shoes to work. You want to maintain good circulation, so try not to cross your legs for too long, and when you're relaxing on the couch, put your feet up.

Step one is truly the most important of these, as only your doctor will be able to help you accurately maintain your blood glucose levels in order to keep you're the healthiest, and stave off neuropathy. If your doctor tells you to buy Trajenta or any other diabetes medications, consider Big Mountain Drugs, a Canadian online pharmacy which offers significantly discounted medications, in order to keep you on the best medications without impacting you financially.